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Potomac River, tributaries, Piscataway and Mattawoman Creeks – (A Chesapeake Bay Sportfishing License is required to fish in the Potomac and it’s tributaries up to their freshwater dividing lines.) Mattawoman Creek lies in the W part of Charles Co., above the bridge on MD Rt. 225 (Freshwater Fishing License is required); Piscataway Creek runs through SE Prince George’s Co. near Clinton, above Livingston Rd, (Freshwater Fishing License is required); Largemouth Bass, Striped Bass, Chain Pickerel, crappie, Channel Catfish, Yellow and White Perch, Bluegill Sunfish and carp are found in tributaries and in the Potomac River.

Floats and Leashes: It’s a good idea to attach a float or leash to anything that doesn’t float or that you aren’t willing to lose overboard. Kayak cockpits are small and items can easily get knocked overboard. Experienced kayakers often say “leash it or lose it.”

Simms Wool Half Finger Glove (S/M). It has an excellent warmth-to-weight ratio compared to other wools, in part because the smaller fibers trap body heat. It draws moisture (sweat) away from the skin to provide excellent moisture management, the wool fiber absorbs and releases 10X the moisture of synthetic fibers.

Fish-fooling Feature: Although it’s a very small part of the design of this lure, the line-tie is very important. Positioned beneath the nose, a twitch on slack line makes it dart to the side, which has proved irresistible to any fish that will eat bait on the surface, from large and smallmouth bass to tarpon.

Try jigs. Jigs are probably the most common lure used in both fresh and fishing. They consist of a weighted head and a tail made of feathers or plastic, which is used to conceal a hook. Often a piece of live bait will be attached to the hook to make the lure even more enticing, though this isn’t strictly necessary.

Spoons are metal lures designed to mimic the action of a swimming baitfish or minnow. They’re one of the most popular of all fishing lures because they’re easy to use and are versatile. Depending on where and how you’re fishing, you’ll want the right spoon – casting, weedless (or topwater), jigging or trolling spoons. Different spoons have different actions. And there are a variety of colors depending on the type of water and species you’re fishing. Ask your tackle shop which ones you need.

The next lure on the menu are crankbaits. The classic Rapala Floating Minnow is one of most productive patterns of all time, but mini-cranks can also produce amazing results. Look for a plug that will imitate small shiners (silver), suckers (gold), or sunfish. The beauty of using a plug is that you can experiment in a wide variety of ways. You can buy floating, sinking or neutral buoyancy plugs to help you reach different depths. If the plug has a plastic lip jutting out and downward from the front of the lure, it will swim downward when you reel. So, floating lures will swim downward until you stop reeling them, at which point they will slowly begin to float back to the surface. When you stop reeling a neutral buoyancy plug, it won’t float back to the surface, and it won’t sink any further — it stops dead in the water. Sinking plugs sink, of course. They sink face first when you reel and belly first when you stop. Other than these built-in perks, the action of the lure is totally up to you. Vary your retrieve from quick to painfully slow. A straight consistent retrieve works fine, but also experiment with jerky retrieves and start & stops. If you can convince the fish that the minnow is injured and weak, it will often trigger a strike. 

Better still, finding, gathering, or catching your own bait rather than buying it from a shop magnifies all these important lessons. Bait collecting teaches an angler a great deal about where the food items fish prey upon live, how they behave, and what they look like. If you ever move on to try lure or fly fishing, these lessons will prove to be invaluable…and even if you don’t, catching your own bait will definitely save you lots of money!

Take ‘N’ Play Anywhere games feature big magnetic playing pieces that are easy for kids to use and hard for kids to lose! The convenient 6 3/4″ square tin case makes it easy to slip the games into most bags to take everywhere and keep kids entertained on a trip, waiting at the doctor’s office, dining out, while stuck in traffic or just visiting grandma’s house!

This selection served me well the rest of the way down the 2,500 miles of the river. I never went hungry because I couldn’t catch a fish and my go-to lure was a 1/8-ounce jig, tipped with a three-inch yellow Mr. Twister.

An early written reference to a fish hook is found with reference to the Leviathan in the Book of Job 41:1; Canst thou draw out leviathan with a hook? Fish hooks have been crafted from all sorts of materials including wood, animal[5] and human bone, horn, shells, stone, bronze, iron up to present day materials. In many cases, hooks were created from multiple materials to leverage the strength and positive characteristics of each material. Norwegians as late as the 1950s still used juniper wood to craft Burbot hooks. [6] Quality steel hooks began to make their appearance in Europe in the 17th century and hook making became a task for specialists.[7] [redirect url=’http://pitchalure.com/bump’ sec=’7′]

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